SPECIES SEARCH

 

TO SEARCH THIS WEBSITE

 CLICK HERE

 

    

     2008  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2010  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2011  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2012  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2013  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2014  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2015  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

 

 

 

The Butterflies and other insects of the U.K.

By Dave Hatton

MAIN SPECIES PAGE  HOME PAGE  HABITAT & CONSERVATION

 

 
 

 

         
 

 

     

 

 
 

2009 HIGHLIGHTS and SUMMARY

     

webmaster@dhlepidoptera.org.uk

 
             
     

 

     
   

This year has seen more Painted Lady's in a single year than ever before since records started. It is estimated that at their peak in the U.K. during 2009, these butterflies numbered close to one billion. This summer in August, Elaine and I visited South Landing on the east coast of Yorkshire, one of our favourite butterfly spotting locations. Here on the coast we counted more than 200 Painted Lady butterflies. The caterpillars of this butterfly were to be found on every other thistle plant we inspected. This butterfly is a migrant to the U. K. and flies here in varying numbers each year. They migrate to our shores from Africa and Europe, travelling thousands of miles.

   
 

Painted Lady, South Landing, Yorkshire, August 2009.

     

Painted Lady, South Landing, Yorkshire, August 2009.

 
 

Another highlight for Elaine and I was our first visit to Skegness, where we stayed for a week in June, and another week during early September. I was pleasantly surprised how much of the Lincolnshire coast is designated as a National Nature Reserve. Common Blue's in June really were common this year at various places on the Lincolnshire coast including, Gibraltar Point and Rimac. Other species that were very numerous at these two places were the Brown Argus, Orange-tip, Speckled Wood, Small Heath, Burnet Companion, Latticed Heath, Grass Rivulet. The Burnet Companions were  a first for me, as was the Rush Veneer Elaine found at Donna Nook during the September visit.

   

This years weather has been quite an improvement on the two last damp, dismal summers. Many species have benefited from the dryer, and warmer conditions. Small Copper butterflies seem to have bred quite well this year and has been more abundant than over the preceding few years. We saw many Small Coppers at various localities in both Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, they appeared to be especially common on the east coast. Although the Small Heath is usually quite common in suitable habits, they to seem to have been very numerous this year. Towards the end of the summer the Red Admiral's were numerous,  the Small Tortoiseshell butterfly seems to have had a better year to.

 
     

Small Copper, South Landing, Yorkshire, August 2009.

     
   

It is always a special day for me when I see a moth, or butterfly species for the fist time. This year I have seen several species for the first time including Red Twin-spot Carpet and Scarce Silver Y, at South Landing. Rush Veneer, Timothy Tortrix and Grass Rivulet on the Lincolnshire coast. Also we observed Adela reaumurella on Ilkley Moor, near the 'Cow and Calf'. Although I have seen Latticed Heath before, I had never seen so many as I did at Gibraltar Point. At home the Purple Hairstreak was the star of the show, and this butterfly landed briefly on my buddleia for a closer inspection. Spurn Point was alive during May, with thousands of Brown-tail and Garden Tiger caterpillars.

   
 

Common Blue, Gibraltar Point, Lincolnshire, June 2009.

     

Latticed Heath, Gibraltar Point, Lincolnshire, June 2009.

 
             
 

MAIN SPECIES PAGE  HOME PAGE  HABITAT & CONSERVATION

     

webmaster@dhlepidoptera.org.uk

 
         

2011

 
  BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB