SPECIES SEARCH

 

TO SEARCH THIS WEBSITE

 CLICK HERE

 

    

     2009  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2010  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2011  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2012  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2013  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2014  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

     2015  HIGHLIGHTS AND SUMMARY

 

 

 

The Butterflies and other insects of the U.K.

By Dave Hatton

MAIN SPECIES PAGE  HOME PAGE  HABITAT & CONSERVATION

 

 
 

 

         
 

 

     

 

 
 

2008 HIGHLIGHTS and SUMMARY

     

webmaster@dhlepidoptera.org.uk

 
             
     

 

     
   

I moved into Yorkshire from Staffordshire in June of 2006. This year is my first year in nearly a decade that I have started recording moths and butterflies again. What a poor year I chose to start again, the weather for the most part has been very wet, windy and quite cool throughout most of the summer. How ever I have captured some moths that I had never seen before like the Butterbur and the Black Rustic. A moth I have not seen much of in the past is the Small Dusty Wave which I have also recorded this year, and another species I am pleased to see this year is Blair's Shoulder-knot. I had not seen the Light Brown Apple Moth' before moving to Yorkshire, which here in Farsley is very common.

   
 

Butterbur, Farsley, Pudsey, September 2008.

     

Black Rustic, Farsley, Pudsey, October 2008.

 
 

The appearance of the Butterbur was a bit of a mystery at first. Although we are at the top of the hillside of the Aire Valley, we are some distance from water and the Butterbur plants. Its possible with the strong winds. that this moth made its way here and ended up in my garden. Since researching my local area more, I have found two or three neighbours have garden ponds. A couple of these pools are well established, and one has Butterbur plants growing along one side. The owners of the pool have children, and have been into pool dipping for many years. This probably explains the Butterbur moth and the many Caddis Flies and Frogs we see in our garden.

   

Also this year, I observed Pyrausta aurata which I suspect I accidentally introduced with a few Cat Mint plants, bought from an out of town nursery for my new giant rockery. On my birthday in late April a Holly Blue butterfly flittered across the front garden in the spring sunshine. They appear at home most years in small numbers during the spring, and occasionally in late August or early September. There are quite a few holly tree's in the area, and quite a lot of mature Ivy. I have been visiting Farsley since 2003 and seen Winter moth on several occasions, but not this year. No doubt the heavy rain has drowned a lot of caterpillars this year, and would explain why some species had a poor year.

 
     

Lempke's Gold Spot, Flamborough Head, August 2008.

     
   

Narrow-bordered Five-spot Burnet moths were fairly common at Danes Dyke, and these are a species I had not previously encountered. Lempke's Gold Spot at Flamborough head was a new one for me as well, and the migrant Silver Y was plentiful as well. I had not seen Brown-tail moths since living in Cheshire during my childhood, these moths were extremely numerous at Spurn Point in July.  butterflies were extremely common this year around the east coast, though the majority were some what weather beaten. Meadow Browns also seem to have done quite well, though they were not as numerous as the. Ringlet Gatekeeper butterflies were very numerous during July at Spurn Point.

   
 

Narrow-bordered Five-spot Burnet, Danes Dyke, July 2008.

     

Silver Y, Flamborough Head, August 2008.

 
             
  MAIN SPECIES PAGE  HOME PAGE  HABITAT & CONSERVATION      

webmaster@dhlepidoptera.org.uk

 
         

2011

 
  BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB